Dothan City Schools
Selma Street Elementary School Dothan, AL
Physical Education

Choose Another Sport

P. E. Curriculum

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Kindergarten

1. Demonstrate initial level of efficiency in traveling by walking, running, and jumping.

2. Demonstrate initial level of efficiency in selected nonlocomotor skills, specifically turning and twisting.

3. Demonstrate progress toward the mature form of selected manipulative skills, specifically throwing, kicking, and striking with body parts.

4. Identify differences among fundamental locomotor patterns.

5. Establish a beginning movement vocabulary that includes the terms personal space, high/low levels, fast/slow speeds, light/heavy weights, balance, and twist.

6. Identify differences among fundamental manipulative skills.

7. Apply appropriate concepts to the performance of locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills.

8. Identify likes and dislikes associated with participation in physical activities.

9. Engage in moderate physical activity sustained for a short period of time.

10. Illustrate a physical activity performed outside the physical education class.

11. Identify positive outcomes associated with participation in a physical activity.

12. Recognize the attributes that individuals with differences can bring to group activities.

13. Interact positively with others regardless of personal differences.

14. Work independently and on task for short periods of time.

15. Apply classroom rules, procedures, and safe practices with guidance.

First Grade

1. Demonstrate the ability to walk, run, and jump using mature motor patterns.

2. Demonstrate a developmentally appropriate level of nonlocomotor skills, specifically stretching, curling, bending, and transferring weight.

3. Demonstrate momentary stillness while balancing on a variety of body parts.

4. Demonstrate a developmentally appropriate level of manipulative skills, including throwing, catching, dribbling, kicking, striking with paddles, and striking with body parts.

5. Demonstrate functional understanding of movement vocabulary.

6. Identify cues for selected manipulative skills.

7. Apply appropriate concepts of space, effort, and relationship to performance.

8. Identify preferences in physical activity.

9. Engage in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for short periods of time.

10. Describe activities that take place during and outside of physical education class that require physical exertion.

11. Describe emotions associated with physical activity.

12. Identify the attributes that individuals with differences can bring to group activities.

13. Work independently or harmoniously with a partner or a small group while remaining on task.

14. Apply rules, procedures, and safe practices with minimal reinforcement.

15. Share space and equipment with others.

Second Grade

1. Demonstrate the ability to gallop, hop, and slide using mature motor patterns.

2. Demonstrate developmentally appropriate levels of selected nonlocomotor skills, specifically swinging and balancing.

3. Demonstrate control in weight bearing by balancing on a variety of body parts.

4. Demonstrate selected manipulative skills, including throwing, catching, dribbling, and kicking.

5. Strike a variety of stationary and moving objects with body parts, paddles, and long-handled implements.

6. Identify the critical elements of basic locomotor and manipulative skills.

7. Demonstrate motor patterns in simple combinations.

8. Exhibit the ability to adapt and adjust movement skills in open and closed environments.

9. Identify the components of a health-related physical activity, including flexibility, strength, endurance, body composition, and cardiovascular fitness.

10. Engage in physical activity that causes an increased heart rate and heavy breathing.

11. Identify moderate-to-vigorous physical activities that may be performed outside the physical education class.

12. Identify the benefits of cooperating with others.

13. Discuss the attributes that individual differences can bring to group activities.

14. Play with others without regard for personal differences.

15. Resolve conflicts in a socially acceptable manner.

16. Apply general rules, procedures, and safe practices while remaining on task.

Third Grade

1. Demonstrate skills, including leaping and skipping, using mature motor patterns.

2. Demonstrate developmentally appropriate levels of nonlocomotor skills with transfer of weight.

3. Exhibit key characteristics of manipulative skills during performance, including throwing, catching, and kicking.

4. Demonstrate the ability to strike using body parts, short-handled implements, long-handled implements, and moving objects.

5. Discuss concepts that improve the quality of movement as it relates to space, effort, and relationships.

6. Apply movement concepts to locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative activities.

7. Combine locomotor, nonlocomotor, and manipulative skills in a variety of activities.

8. Identify the physiological indicators that accompany moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

9. Associate results of daily fitness activity with personal health status and ability to perform various skills.

10. Engage in regular physical activity for the purpose of improving skill and personal health.

11. Recognize safe practices when performing skills.

12. Identify physical education class rules and procedures.

13. Exhibit cooperative skills in partner or small-group settings.

14. Demonstrate elements of acceptable conflict resolution.

15. Work independently and on task for extended periods of time.

16. Participate in an event that promotes physical education.

Fourth Grade

1. Demonstrate mature form of all nonlocomotor skills, including twisting, turning, leaning, stretching, curling, bending, swinging, balancing, and transferring of weight.

2. Demonstrate selected manipulative skills, including throwing, catching, and kicking, while using proper mechanics and accuracy.

3. Demonstrate control while striking with short-handled implements.

4. Demonstrate mature form when striking with long-handled implements in static situations.

5. Recognize correct and incorrect forms of motor skills.

6. Apply concepts that improve the quality of performance while traveling.

7. Adapt combined movement skills in a variety of situations.

8. Identify activities that correlate with the components of health-enhancing physical activity (flexibility, muscular endurance, muscular strength, and cardiovascular endurance).

9. Differentiate among intensity levels of exercise.

10. Record participation in self-selected activities that improve identified areas of weakness in personal fitness.

11. Identify resources available in the community that offer opportunities for physical fitness activities.

12. Recognize the attributes that individuals bring to group activities.

13. Collaborate with a partner or small group for a common purpose.

14. Demonstrate a physical activity as a means of self-expression.

15. Relate positively to people of different backgrounds while participating in activities of different national, cultural, and ethnic origins.

16. Apply specific rules, strategies, and etiquette to activities with minimal reminders.

17. Organize a presentation for others that promotes awareness of physical activity.

Fifth Grade

1. Perform the critical elements of opposition, balance, weight transfer, and fluid movement patterns involved in all nonlocomotor skills.

2. Demonstrate the critical elements of opposition, balance, weight transfer, and fluid movement patterns involved in all basic manipulative skills.

3. Describe how the movement concepts of time, force, flow, direction, level, pathways, and relationships impact the quality of complex movement patterns.

4. Describe balance and weight transfer in a game, sport, dance, or gymnastic routine.

5. Recognize basic concepts of game strategies.

6. Perform movement concepts in increasingly complex patterns.

7. Critique elements of fundamental and specialized movement skills to provide feedback to others.

8. Identify basic principles of training and conditioning for physical activities.

9. Associate results of fitness testing with personal fitness goals and the ability to perform various activities.

10. Engage in daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in a variety of settings.

11. Develop an individual fitness plan based on personal fitness goals.

12. Utilize information from a variety of sources to improve fitness/skill performance.

13. Recognize individual differences and similarities while participating in group activities.

14. Create physical activities that provide opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, social interaction, and integration of other subject areas.

15. Work independently to improve movement skills.

16. Apply rules, procedures, and etiquette to physical activities.